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"Canadian Photography IV"
Issue date: 13th April 2016

Canada Post issued a series of 7 commemorative stamps honoring Canadian photography. The seven designs were issued on stamps in booklets (die-cut/self-adhesive), in souvenir sheets (perforated/gummed) and on international-rate postal cards. 

One stamp features a peak. The photo on the stamp is called “Climbing Mount Habel” (c. 1909) of the photographer Byron Harmon.

Byron Harmon was a charter member of the Alpine Club of Canada and its first official photographer. He captured the grandeur of the Canadian Rockies and the courage of those who explored them in thousands of photographs housed at the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in Banff, Alberta.

There is a Mount Habel in the Canadian Rockies, found near the Wapta Icefield. But according greatdividenaturenotes.blogspot it is not the photographed mountain on the stamp. The mountain on the stamp is called Mount des Poilus (3'166 m) and it's located (51°35'39.71"N 116°36'22.75"W) in the Yoho Valley (Yoho National Park). Mount des Poilus was originally named for the German mountaineer Jean Habel, who first explored the Yoho Valley in 1897.

It was renamed in a fit of patriotic re-naming after the end of World War I. The rest of the story from peakfinder.com tells: “One week following the armistice which ended the First World War, eleven peaks in the Kananaskis Area were named after prominent French military leaders who had served during the confict. "Les Annales," a French publication, had suggested that one mountain be named, "for the great hero of the age, the humble and fascinating poilu (the lowest ranking soldiers of the French Army) who had battled the invading Germans." Arthur O. Wheeler was asked to recommend a peak and the fact that he chose Mount Habel to become Mount des Poilus may have had something to do with the fact that Jean Habel was a German citizen. However almost seventy years later Jean Habel’s name was again placed on a mountain in the Canadian Rockies. Author Graeme Pole’s suggestion that a peak on the Continental Divide just north of Yoho National Park be named Mount Habel was accepted by the authorities in 1987.”

The stamps of the miniaturesheet (left) show a portrait of Grey Owl (Archibald Belaney, 1888-1938), shown on a $2.50 stamp, he was one of the earliest and most memorable photographic portraits by Canada’s greatest photographer, Yousuf Karsh. The next stamp shows Sans titre 0310, a contemporary abstract work by Montreal’s Michel Campeau from his 2005-10 series and "Climbing Mount Habel" of Byron Harmon.

The four stamps (miniaturesheet right) depict 20th-century photographs taken by photographers who immigrated to Canada from Germany: Toronto, a poignant scene, was captured in 1960 by Lutz Dille on the streets of his adopted hometown; and Window, a dreamlike image, was made in 1988 by Angela Grauerholz, who has been a resident of Montreal since 1976. The Victoria Bridge, Grand Trunk Railway, Montreal, Quebec, made circa 1878 by Alexander Henderson and Freighter’s Boat on the Banks of the Red River, Manitoba, shot in 1858 by Humphrey Lloyd.

The printing totals were 130,000 booklets of 10 of the permanent-rate stamps; 120,000 six-stamp booklets each of the $1.20 (Mount Habel) and $2.50 (Grey Owl) stamps; and 100,000 each of the souvenir sheets.

 

 

Canada
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2016
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